Q

Anonymous asked:

I am of European heritage, considered white and it seems as though I face many of the same issues that you face in terms of beauty. I know your argument about feminism for WoC extends far beyond physical appearances, but I find it a little insulting when you basically put the need to shave to only WoC. As a child I was teased endlessly regarding my 'hairiness'. Most women have an issue with body hair so distinguishing between white/WoC feminism counterproductive and unfair in this sense. Thanks!

A

thebonescollection:

While I was writing that comment I had exactly this thought but I am highly aware that when I speak about these topics, I can only speak on behalf of the person or group that I represent. Because I am Anglo-Indian, I speak for a broader community of brown people, half Indian people, Anglo-Indian and biracial coloured people (among others, and also very generally). I can empathise to some degree with your experience of course, but it is not the same because it does not have the same histories as mine. I can’t talk about your experience as a European person because it’s not my lived experience and for this reason I think it’s inappropriate for me to be a voice in what is essentially your conversation. You are entitled to your experiences and of course, your feelings and opinions shaped by these are completely valid – it would be so wrong of me to invalidate them! Especially because this validation of experience is what I aim for by participating in intersectional feminist discourse.

It is important that you remember too that intersectional feminism only exists because identity is intersectional and of course, experiences are common among many women from all walks of life. Intersectionality as a branch of cultural studies considers that experience as a coloured woman intersects with many cultural issues – for example, my experience as a half-Indian woman can’t be divided up into “half-Indian issues” and “women’s issues” as for me, these two parts of my identity are so entwined and their issues are often common ones. Because my experience intersects with issues that are common among many women, both white and non-white, it’s a more appropriate discourse for me to be involved in because it caters to me but also to a broader range of women.

I am always very explicit about the context at which I speak from, which of course is the perspective of an Anglo-Indian woman in White Australian society. I am explicit about this because, as I stated earlier, I am not able to truly empathise with your experience and so have no right to control this discourse – I can contribute, but should only foster conversation, not direct it. This is exactly how I feel about white women in the black feminist conversation – participation in this discourse is important, but white women must stand beside or behind coloured women, and not tell them how it’s going to be or what they “deserve” but instead stand in support. This is because whiteness is coded with a long history of institutionalised privilege and Western standards of living aren’t necessarily appropriate for all women (but that’s a whole other conversation).

Distinguishing between coloured feminism and white feminism is extremely important, and not differentiating them is damaging and counterproductive for every community that doesn’t fit the mainstream ideas of feminism (which are overwhelmingly middle class and white). Distinguishing differences and celebrating cultural pluralism is important because to not do that is to render my experience invalid which of course, is exactly what you took from my comment and have been offended by. It is also incredibly important for us to learn from the experiences of the Other, whether it be through cultural practices or expressions, or through ways of making, living and doing. To not do this is the effectively “colonise” the feminist conversation as being one that can only conform to mainstream ideas of “freedom”, “liberation” and “civility”, which unfortunately exist almost exclusively within Western, European grammar (because “globalisation”/”colonialism”/”Western dominance”). Intersectional feminism allows a negotiation of these terms, which is a major, major part of all the work that I do.

kobetyrant:

can we stop praising white people for not being racist

lol

(via thebrowncrown)

Q

Anonymous asked:

Even your hand is sexy.

A

lolsocreepy

Q

Anonymous asked:

I had no idea that was your dad in that media watch segment. Good on him for coming forward and showing that horrific footage. Hope that he and your family are ok. Fingers crossed that it was not in vain, and that drivers change their attitudes towards cyclists on the road. You're absolutely right, they could be someone's mother, father, sister, brother, son or daughter. That really hit home. Bless x

A

Thank you for this message! I am really glad it hit home. I hope watching that video and reading my message is as close as anyone else comes to what cycle-hate can eventuate to. My family is great because my family are strong people individually and a serious unit together – it would be so easy after something like that though to let it win, but my parents would never let that happen!!

lesmeaning:

me flirting: so… capitalism… pretty fucked up right

yep

(via axcli0)

Huge preteen party going on in the house behind us playing super unchill beats so loud it’s in my head. 😶 Some of us are really hungover ya know, kids these days, etc.

Drank: Worst Behaviour

~ tune ~

Angel Haze: Werkin’ Girls

What a banger!

also i have the bigggggest crush on this gal hey

lolaagets:

bathsabbath:

piscula:

skooth:

bhavatarini:

myblacksexuality:

poetofwar333:

#cleopatra with the nose knocked off. I wonder if people still think she was European like the movies betray…

I still think it’s one of the most desperate things whites have done to blacks and to black history. The disrespect is outrageous. They came to our country and mentally could not fathom how these black civilizations could be so great. They literally rode through our lands and shot the noses off of our statues. Why? So that the statues would no longer resemble the African people and they could LIE about the origins of Egypt and countless other civilizations. It was a widespread practice. It’s why statues of Pharaoh’s and their wives have no noses. It’s why the Sphinx has no nose. When I was in middle and high school, we were taught that the noses had fell off due to time and poor craftsmanship! They have literally tried to teach us that our ancestors were shitty builders of noses just to hide their malicious destruction of our heritage. European fears of African peoples had to come from somewhere. I want to know what part of the history is missing. There’s something that they don’t want to be told.

The shade is real

i was taught that the noses fell off as well and actually continued to believe this. in retrospect this makes no sense, considering greek/roman statues pretty much always have intact noses whereas egyptian ones are always conveniently missing theirs. thank you for pointing this out to me, i hadn’t even made that connection until now.

The bolded was me too and I am seriously embarrassed that I never even thought about how that could be false.

Damnnn. I hate myself for not realizing this.

    I hate myself even more, since I know the ancient Egyptians created their sculptural works with the idea of permanence in mind. They were literally built to last throughout the afterlife. Notice how the majority of their monumental sculpture is stone-bound, without any protruding elements or breakable appendages. That’s because many of these sculptures were intended to house the life-force (Ka) of those they portrayed. Of their favorite materials were basalt and diorite, both extremely hard stones that were incredibly difficult to carve. Meaning a nose just doesn’t “fall off” because of “poor craftsmanship,” you would literally have to take a hammer to it. Fuckers.

This is scary. The lengths they go to LIE. Jesus Christ. I thought the nose had fallen off too.

#realness but I am going to verify this with some scholarly sources at some point

(via hannahsugarplum)

thebonescollection:

Trigger warning: The video on this page features a car accident. The footage is not particularly gruesome but may be upsetting to some viewers.

This post is a little close to home, so bear this in mind when reading onwards…

To all the motorists who don’t appreciate the presence of cyclists on the road, please watch this! And please understand that while you’re attempting to intimidate a cyclist on the road in some kind of expression of hatred, you are actually putting somebodies father, mother, brother, sister, son or daughter in serious danger. Case in point: the cyclist featured in this video that was hit is my dad and it breaks my heart to see this every, single, time.

The original footage is available here and it’s a little longer with dialogue at the end. It is worth watching if you can stomach it. Again, trigger warning. My dad has answered some questions in the comment below as correspondence on the video is limited, but he details the circumstances a little more as well as the aftermath and other bike related details.

A break from my usual bullshit for a serious bout of #realness: watch if you dare. This episode of Media Watch features the accident my dad had in 2011 where he was hit from behind by a car on his way to work. Breaks my heart every time I watch it, but I think it is SO important to make this footage available and have it be seen because the reality of cycle-hate needs to be vivid in peoples minds. Hopefully not as vivid as it is in mine or my parents, as we’d never wish that on anyone, but it is important to me especially that everyone can learn something from his experiences.

thebonescorrexion:

Here are some creepy headshot samples from the aforementioned video project. Definitely going to be pretty cool and weird. I think I’ll make these my new “design” portfolio headshots.

:3 exciting times
also for those of y’all that didn’t know, this is my glitch blog for all my experiments and offcuts and what have you. check it thebonescorrexion:

Here are some creepy headshot samples from the aforementioned video project. Definitely going to be pretty cool and weird. I think I’ll make these my new “design” portfolio headshots.

:3 exciting times
also for those of y’all that didn’t know, this is my glitch blog for all my experiments and offcuts and what have you. check it thebonescorrexion:

Here are some creepy headshot samples from the aforementioned video project. Definitely going to be pretty cool and weird. I think I’ll make these my new “design” portfolio headshots.

:3 exciting times
also for those of y’all that didn’t know, this is my glitch blog for all my experiments and offcuts and what have you. check it

thebonescorrexion:

Here are some creepy headshot samples from the aforementioned video project. Definitely going to be pretty cool and weird. I think I’ll make these my new “design” portfolio headshots.

:3 exciting times

also for those of y’all that didn’t know, this is my glitch blog for all my experiments and offcuts and what have you. check it

this zine is on a shelf at work
honoured to say that at least 1 person a day thinks we look alike
:3

this zine is on a shelf at work

honoured to say that at least 1 person a day thinks we look alike

:3

Setting up for tomorrow’s datamosh shoot about diversity in Australia feat. exclusively multiracial Aussies ✌️✌️


You are meeting me when I’m old and ugly. You ought to have met me when I was young and ugly!

You are meeting me when I’m old and ugly. You ought to have met me when I was young and ugly!

(via schisms)